Gardening

Green Potatoes

June 18, 2009

Last week during an early walk in the garden, I was bummed to discover that I could see the tops of a few new gold potatoes, and they were green! Having been warned of the dangers of eating green potatoes but not sure what to do, I pulled the whole bunch.

Green Yukon Gold Potatoes

Green Yukon Gold Potatoes

My first impulse was to compost them and get the “diseased” potatoes far, far away. Then, I wasn’t sure if composting them was safe, either. So I researched quite a bit and found a study out of the University of Kansas explaining that it is chlorophyl (sunlight hitting the skin) that causes the potatoes to green, and that in small quantities, it’s unlikely to cause any harm. Plus, if you skin the potatoes, you’ve removed the chlorophyl and the danger.

Also – a quick side note for my fellow gardeners – the study showed that gold potatoes have a thinner, more delicate skin than red or russet potatoes and are more susceptible to going green.

So, out of the composter the potatoes came. 🙂

Rinsed Green Potatoes

Rinsed Green Potatoes

I didn’t get around to peeling them (I hate peeling potatoes!) for a few days, after a long rain had passed and I had discovered yet another bunch of green potatoes. This time I acted quickly, bought pine straw, and tucked it in around all my potato plants. Then, I skinned the green potatoes and boiled them to make a batch of gold mashed potatoes.

Peeled and Boiled Gold Potatoes

Peeled and Boiled Gold Potatoes

Using a red smashed potato recipe I found on Epicurious not too long ago, I hand mashed the potatoes instead of using a ricer and added just a bit of sea salt and good olive oil. Delicious!

Gold Smashed Potatoes with Olive Oil & Sea Salt

Gold Smashed Potatoes with Olive Oil & Sea Salt

I had these for lunch on Monday. It’s Thursday, and I’m still here, so I’d say this is an excellent use of green potatoes!

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**UPDATE (09/29/09): I received a comment on my old blog today reprimanding me for not tossing the green potatoes and advising me that I should read up on my history of the Irish Potato Famine… *sigh*

Since I am taking that blog down (no need for repetition), I thought I would address the concern here. First, I am not a plant pathologist, but I do try to research everything I offer up as sound wisdom on this blog. Second, the potatoes only showed green near the tops and at the surface, where they were exposed to sunlight and the process of photosynthesis had begun. Third, green does indicate that a toxin known as solanine is present. Large amounts of this toxin can cause stomach upset and is very unsafe for children or pregnant women. Fourth, if you remove the green areas, as I did and recommended in this original post, the potatoes are perfectly safe to eat.

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7 Comments

  • Reply mandy June 23, 2009 at 12:05 am

    go dede!

    p.s. I would love to see more pictures of your gardens!

    [Reply]

  • Reply Update: Green Potatoes « Dee Wilcox September 30, 2009 at 8:01 am

    […] received a comment on my old blog yesterday reprimanding me for not tossing the green potatoes I pulled this spring and advising me that I should read up on my history of the Irish Potato Famine… […]

  • Reply Name Giannotta April 2, 2011 at 5:43 pm

    Your comment… Would you have any objection to me using your picture of green potatoes for a potato project on growing potatoes that I am presenting for my Master Gardener class in Pittsburgh, PA? After the class, it will probably be presented to gardening groups or at Master Gardener events around the community, according to interest levels. I am happy to credit your website on the photo. To my knowledge, there will not be any money made from the presentation, it’s just for educating members of the community on growing potatoes. Thank you and happy gardening!

    [Reply]

    Dee Reply:

    Hi, Giannotta,

    You are more than welcome to use my pictures from my Green Potatoes post. Please do credit me in your presentation of the images.

    If I can help with anything, let me know. Happy gardening to you as well!

    [Reply]

  • Reply Arlene Kuchcik April 23, 2013 at 6:46 pm

    If the green potatoes are toxic, why do stores sell them. It seems that every bag I’ve been buying, the potatoes have that green hue to them. I don’t like to peel the potatoes because of the nutrients in the skins, but I certainly will from now on!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    [Reply]

    Dee Reply:

    That’s a good question, Arlene. I think stores sell them because the green skins can be removed — they’re not totally ruined. It’s the same reason they sell bruised bananas and soft onions.

    If you just peel the green parts, and leave the rest of the skin on, you should be fine. That’s what I do. 🙂

    Thanks for stopping by!

    [Reply]

  • Reply rhys May 1, 2013 at 9:33 am

    just dont eat them or even think about green potatos there useless and horrible buy good 1s 😀

    [Reply]

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